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Contracts: Cases and Commentaries, Eighth Edition
Stephanie Ben-Ishai, Associate Professor, David R. Percy, Q.C., Christine Boyle, John D. McCamus, Robert Flanigan
ISBN/ISSN: 978-0-7798-2163-1
Product Type: Book
Number Of Volumes: 1 volume bound
Number Of Pages: Approximately 1050 pages
Binding: softcover
Publication Date: 2009-07-31
Publisher: Carswell
Canadian Price: $136.00
Book Description
Extensively revised and updated since its previous publication in 2004, Contracts: Cases and Commentaries, 8th Edition continues to be the teaching tool of choice among Canadian contracts professors.

This book allows students to learn the law of contracts by firstly gaining a familiarity with the substantive law. Substantive law includes the law relating to the formation of contracts, factors affecting the validity of contracts, and remedies for when a party breaches the contract. A familiarity with these principles will serve as a useful stepping-stone to courses drawing on the general principles of contract law — such as the sale of goods, consumer protection, insurance, real estate transactions, and labour law.

In addition, this book will teach students how to engage in analysis of areas of law where overlapping or conflicting values are at stake, such as human rights law and property law, by reflecting on a value fundamental to the law of contracts, such as freedom of contract.

On a different level, this book will facilitate the acquisition of a variety of basic skills associated with the analysis and use of case law and, to a lesser extent, legislation. This book is designed as an aid to the acquisition of these essential skills, via the study and discussion of the decisions of the courts as well as statutory law and academic comment.

New to the 8th edition:
  • Added learning objectives to the beginning of each chapter to help guide the student’s focus towards the key concepts and theories within each chapter
  • Edited notes and questions following the cases to make them more succinct and relevant to the student
  • New web page where additional questions and material will be available
  • Updated several full cases and references to other cases throughout the book

About the Author(s)
Stephanie Ben-Ishai is an Associate Professor of Law, Osgoode Hall Law School. She has written extensively in the area of bankruptcy and insolvency law on both commercial and consumer issues. She has acted as a consultant to governments, SROs, and the Law Commission of Canada on commercial and corporate law and policy. Professor Ben-Ishai is a past winner of the American Bankruptcy Institute Medal of Excellence and Fulbright and SSHRC fellowships. She was recently awarded the 2008/9 Osgoode Hall Research Leave Fellowship to pursue her research on insolvency law. Before entering academics, Professor Ben-Ishai practised with the Insolvency and Restructuring Group at a major Toronto law firm and also clerked for three judges at the Court of Appeal for Ontario.

John D. McCamus is a Professor of Law and University Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. Prior to joining the Osgoode faculty, he articled with Toronto law firm Fasken and Calvin and served as a law clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada for Chief Justice Laskin. At Osgoode he served as Dean from 1982 to 1987, and his principal areas of research have included private law, restitution and contract, commercial law and information practices law.

From 1993 to 1996, Professor McCamus served as Chair of the Ontario Law Reform Commission. He is an experienced adjudicator in human rights and labour disputes, has acted as an arbitrator in commercial disputes and is currently Chair of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Professor McCamus is an Associated Scholar in the Toronto office of Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP and a member of the Advisory Committee of the American Law Institute's Restatement of the Law Third, Restitution and Unjust Enrichment.